Rabbit Rehoming – COVID 19

BEFORE VISITING THE CENTRE PLEASE READ THROUGH ALL THE INFORMATION BELOW SO THAT YOU CAN BE READY FOR YOUR NEW ADDITION TO YOUR FAMILY AND SO THAT WE ONLY KEEP YOU HERE FOR A MINIMUM AMOUNT OF TIME – THANK YOU

 

If you do not have a carrier to transport them home in you can purchase one from us

 

SETTLING YOUR RABBITS INTO YOUR NEW HOME

Please ensure that your rabbits remain in their new home for two weeks before allowing them to free roam or move from one accommodation to another ie: a separate run.  This is to ensure that they remain fully bonded whilst settling in.

If you have adopted a newly bonded pair of rabbits you will be given information regarding what you need to do at the time of adoption.

 

FEEDING YOUR RABBITS

  • 80% of a rabbit’s diet should be made up of grass and good quality hay.

 

  • Small amount of dried complete rabbit food (Nuggets not muesli).

 

  • A variety of fresh veg should be given daily, of which about 75% should be leafy greens, for example, spring greens, kale, parsley, basil and dandelion. Small amounts and a variety of other fresh veg, for example, broccoli, carrots, peppers and cabbage. Fruit only to be given as a treat on the odd occasion. Vegetables to avoid include onions, potatoes, avocado, rhubarb and iceberg lettuce. Many other vegetables can be given but always check before feeding.

 

  • Fresh, clean water should always be available.

 

 

CARING FOR YOUR RABBITS WELFARE – COMMON ISSUES

Always perform regular weekly health checks on your rabbits and check bums daily.

What to look out for:

Diarrhoea

  • Cut out all dried foods and supply just good quality hay for a few days. If no improvement, visit the vet, serve diarrhea can lead to dehydration.

Worms & Fleas

  • If seen obtain liquid wormer or flea treatment from the vet. Fleas can spread myxomatosis.

Mucky bum

  • Check daily to ensure no fly infestation in the area. Wash gently with warm water and dry thoroughly.

Snuffles

  • May include snotty nose, runny eyes, sneezing and wheezing. Is likely to be a bacterial infection, keep eyes and nose clean with cotton wool in cooled boiled water and seek veterinary advice.

Ear Scratching

  • If ears are dirty, clean with cotton wool and cooled boiled water. If the condition persists, visit the vet. If there are any signs of mites visit the vet.

Teeth

  • Rabbits are prone to teeth problems as their teeth never stop growing, check front teeth regularly. Make sure to have your vet check over them regularly too.

Claws

  • Claws should be checked regularly. If you notice that your rabbits claws are too long then they may need clipping this is something that you can do at home yourself using appropriate clippers or you can ask your local vets to do this for you. 

 

                       

  • If you cannot keep your adopted pet, it MUST be returned to the CRRC
  • This is for the duration of their lifetime
  • If you fail to keep the terms of the agreement you have signed the CRRC WILL reclaim the pet without question

 

Pet Insurance

  • We strongly recommend that you take insurance for your rabbit giving you peace of mind should your rabbit become ill or injured veterinary costs can easily exceed a £1000 for something of a serious nature.
Pet Plan Insurance Cover – You will be issued with this at the time of adoption

 

The insurance is effective immediately the Charity Cover Note is issued (subject to the standard exclusions) and covers the animal for the first 4 weeks from the date of re-homing.

 

BENEFITS

COVER

Veterinary Fees
Up to £1,000

Excluding  current excess for each unrelated illness or injury

For cats and for rabbits.

Death from injury or illness

 

Refund of Donation given, up to £100

 

 

Third Party Liability

As detailed on Petplan Policy.

 

 

Animals aged from 8 weeks are eligible.

Once covered an owner may continue insurance for the lifetime of the animal with extension to full cover and subsequent annual renewals.

Our Catchment Area